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WEB CONTENT

Web contentContent is King

In Web 20 Content is king, so make it a primary and long-term investment. Content means information – whatever format it is held in (for example, text, audio, images, video, and Flash animations). It is what the medium ‘contains’ rather than the format in which it is held- and is what will stimulate and satisfy the needs of end-customers.

Social Networks are a new and powerful arena for tourism marketers. Identify your market segments to decide the priority audiences and topics, and be clear about which publishing channels you will use, and what formats these channels need. Don’t do it all yourself, work with partners to achieve quality content. Images and video are becoming paramount, both to motivate and inform.

An open data platform to take in and feed out content, and a good content management system with well-trained users, are essential investments. Content is stored separately from the various ways in which it is delivered –your websites and other people’s, via print, contact centres, mobile phones, radio and TV. Some of the information may be collected with a specific medium or target market in mind, but the guiding principle is that wherever possible it should be capable of being formatted for any need.

In daily practice there is a distinction between data and editorial content:
• Product data (including geocodes), stored in structured databases, with someone originating or procuring the data, and monitoring the quality of it.
• Editorial content created in, or imported into, a content management system (CMS), with a web editor and other staff responsible for this.
The division is practical, but it can lead to duplication unless the two work closely together, within the same overall marketing team.

The customer’s first and favoured source of information seems likely to become user-generated content (UGC). Some 70% of Internet content is forecast to be created by individuals as opposed to publishers and brands within three years. UGC is set to rapidly shift from a budding consumer trend to a serious business over the next five years. Despite the ongoing challenges facing UGC sites to find a business model that works, and despite continued hesitancy among some major brands to even go near the explosive space, eMarketer predicts that category leaders such as YouTube, MySpace, Facebook and Photobucket will lead the charge in terms of legitimizing the medium over the next five years.

The nearly tenfold increase in UGC advertising spending in the US reflects optimism in the ability of companies like YouTube, MySpace and Facebook to continue to build and retain vast audiences. Plus, users have shown no indication that creating their own Web content for others to consume is a passing fad, found eMarketer. By 2011, the researcher estimates there will be 95 million Web users creating content online, up from 64 million in 2006.

Video is vital. Consumers have already adopted do-it-yourself video, and the sharing of it on sites like YouTube, in massive numbers. Video is likely to be the key tool for creating awareness and projecting brand values. Done well, it is powerful, emotive, personal and persuasive. The combination of UGC video and professionally-produced video will be the mainstay of online travel communication between tourism businesses and their customers, and between visitors.

Establishing identity and trust with the customer are vital in online marketing. These are qualities that are hard to establish and easy to lose. Your content therefore needs to be:
• Accurate
• Timely
• Attractive and motivational

Be transparent about who produced the content, whether your own or that of third parties. This applies to everything from weather forecasts and hotel reviews to blogs containing personal opinions. Advertorials and sponsored content should be identified as [Sponsored Article] or [Advertisement]. It should always be clear who is talking. Do not hesitate to use the logo of a partner where it is justified.
For internal quality control, set standards and then audit them at regular intervals – frequently if for volatile types of content, and annually for the rest.
etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

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Posted in Best practice, Development, Education and qualification, IT, Market knowledge, Performance and management, Sale and marketing.

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Poor Tourism – An emerging trend!

IMG_3814As adventures fall short for the international travelers, a new trend emerges out of the graves and debris of the meager slums in the world. They call it “Slum Tourism” OR “Poor tourism”. For those who fancy a chance to see how the other half of the world lives without the luxurious amenities of life, goes to these special tours to the underprivileged neighborhood of the world. The impoverished areas in the world like the African countries or the remote areas in the Indian sub-continent top the chart of this innovative travel trend, popularly called as poor tourism. Some examples of the poor tourism trends include a trip to the Bronx, Brazil’s Favelas, the townships of South Africa and New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward. While this type of tourism strives for authenticity, some are coming out and saying it is unethical and exploitative voyeurism.

According to the World Tourism Organiza­tion (UNWTO), international tourist arrivals in developing countries are increasing and tourism is gaining importance as a driver of development, exports and jobs. Tourists increasingly look for cultural and natural attractions in rural areas, thereby increasing the scope for poverty reduction in developing countries due to their comparative advantage. In addition, UNWTO argues that more women and young people, who are proportionally more disadvantaged, find jobs within this poor tourism structure.

IMG_3523With the advent of “Poorism” or Poor tourism, it arguably becomes unethical and exploiting at times. Consider a situation where a group of travelers get inside the house of a local family to experience their living standards. Isn’t it really pathetic and demeaning for that family? With the boom of this tourism comes a wave of disapproval. The way the tours are run becomes especially questionable when the tours are led with no interaction with the people and when none of the profits are put back into the community. It’s not all tours to impoverished areas that are misrepresenting the area that they’re visiting, several slum tours have won prizes for their responsible and sustainable tourism because they actually try to improve the local situations and they try to paint a different picture and show people that it’s actually an area where people live. And while some people are motivated to slums via their quest for something exotic, there are still people who go because of moral reasons and who want to see the whole context of a country they love.

With pros and cons of the poor tourism coming in the fore front of the world and the educated society, it becomes the duty of the affluent class to monitor and influence the practices which will inevitably augment the growth of the rural areas in the world. The implementation of sustainable tourism, adventure tourism in the remote areas should be blended in the right proportion to bring in the best results. UNWTO and the other travel association of the world should take keen interest in this developing travel trend of the world, popularly indicated as “Poor Tourism”.

This article is quoted from Travel and Tour . Follow this link to read the original article published June 20, 2013.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Thomsen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

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Posted in Africa, Americas, Asia, Asia Pacific, Caribbean, Central America, Customer opinions, Development, East Asia, Education and qualification, Europe, Market knowledge, Middle East, N11, North Africa, North America, Northeast Asia, Oceania, Performance and management, South America, South Asia, Sub Saharan, Sustainability, World.

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E-COMMERCE

ecommerceFrom Getting Attention to Getting Paid
E-commerce is a marketplace on the internet where buying and selling transactions are carried out. Like a traditional marketplace, there is a place – one or more websites – where this happens. E-commerce also means being able to select, book and pay in ‘real time’ – so the system has to know that the product is available to buy at that moment. Systems can talk to each other in real time to enable this.

Africa faces a massive challenge in the worlds e-commerce marketplace. In the majority of African countries- ecommerce is neither possible nor legal. Basic banking regulations block online payments, and along with it, block business, growth and development. It is vital that Governments and the financial sector across Africa enact e-commerce laws and facilitation for the benefit of their economies, their tourism sector and their future.

There are however solutions for companies that do wish to begin using e-commerce. In countries where E- commerce is legal, such as South Africa, e-commerce solutions have been established that are thriving and now offer services to businesses in other countries. Alternatively, business can partner with offshore e-commerce providers via specific tourism solutions that they house in their own site.

These solutions are usually targeted towards smaller businesses which do not have an in-house e-commerce system- and work like this:
• The customer enters their credit card details on a page of the merchant’s website (a hotel, for example)
• The website encrypts the information before it is sent from the customer’s browser to the hotel’s website server, usually using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption
• The hotel’s web server forwards the transaction to their payment gateway service, such as Worldpay . This gateway service has provided the credit card form that the buyer has filled in
• The gateway forwards the transaction information to the hotel’s bank (the acquiring bank)
• The acquiring bank then forwards the information to the bank that issued the credit card to the customer (the issuing bank) for authorisation
• The issuing bank sends a response back to the payment gateway (via the acquiring bank) with a response code to approve or decline the transaction
• The payment gateway forwards it to the website, where it is interpreted and a response is sent to the customer, on the website and usually also via an email
• The process should take only a few seconds. The banks settle up with each other separately, at the end of their settlement periods.

An additional payment method is PayPal.(owned by eBay). PayPal users sign up with PayPal to send, receive and hold money online. Their PayPal account can be linked to their bank account, and it can be in a number of currencies. However, Paypal does not currently allow users from most African countries and many other emerging destinations.

As in pre-internet days, there is constant competition online between those who sell direct and those who are intermediaries. Most tourism businesses will opt to do both. Like the display in a walk-in shop, any e-commerce offer needs to be put in front of enough of the right potential customers. So it is vital to consider how much distribution can be achieved, beyond whatever your own website can provide, and at what cost.

Direct Sale
The first channel of distribution is when the merchant (a hotel, for example) acts as their own e-commerce direct seller. Every large business, and a rapidly increasing number of small businesses, now do this. The options may include:
• Using one of the many commercially-available booking systems that specialise in your kind of tourism business
• Subscribing to one of the commercial networks that provide e-commerce systems to buy or rent, such as Guestlink or Frontdesk
• Joining the local, regional or national tourist office e-commerce system, if one is offered. This may itself utilise one of the commercial networks
• Selling via intermediaries

The issues for businesses are:
Are the bookings worth the commission cost?
How can your inventory be delivered automatically to such resellers?

Via resellers who sell online direct to the public
Thanks to the internet, the distinction between tour operators and agents is blurred. Examples of resellers that tourism busineses may want to sell through are eBookers in Europe, Orbitz in the USA, Expedia , Opodo , Lastminute , Superbreak in the UK, and Wotif in Australia and New Zealand. There will be different market leaders in each of your target markets. These offers are often summarised in price comparison websites such as Kayak . In the UK, Travel Supermarket users can compare prices of more than 3,000 B&Bs in the UK from over 20 accommodation websites including SME specialist eviivo (which runs Frontdesk), as well as eBookers and Opodo .

The more specialist retail travel agents sell fully independent tours (FITs), whether bespoke or pre-packaged. Their sales outlets may include websites and walk-in shops. They may also have a central call centre, or distribute calls from a central telephone number to their shops. They buy their stock direct from hotels and carriers, and from wholesalers.

Via wholesalers who sell to specialist retail travel agents
Wholesaler websites give retail travel agents an easy view of a large number of supplier websites’ content, and allow the agent to pick and mix to assemble the FIT. Examples are www.travelcog.com and www.agents.octopustravel.com Online agents now sell local services that were previously only bought direct by the visitor locally, so there is a need for small businesses to gain diistribution via them. These wholesalers generally deal with any suitable business that will give them an allocation of their inventory.

Via the Global distribution systems
The global distribution systems (GDS) are Amadeus, Sabre, Galileo and Worldspan. These are the linked computer systems that, before the internet arrived, allowed over 450 airlines, 50 major car rental companies and ‘only’ 37,000 hotels to be booked by around half a million travel agents anywhere in the world. The hotels they sell are mostly those of the major chains. Costs for the travel suppliers in maintaining their ICT links to the GDSs are high, and so is commission on bookings to the GDS and the agent. They remain very strong for business travel – for example, the new Silverjet low-cost business-class airline expects 60% of bookings from agents via the GDS.
GDS distribution is highly significant for medium-size hotels and for groups of smaller hotels that have a common reservation system. Also, they help to power much of the content of the global website brands, especially those they own: Sabre owns Travelocity and LastMinute, for example, and Galileo’s parent Travelport also owns Expedia and Octopus. An example of the onward distribution they achieve is that Octopus is providing hotel accommodation, and call centre back-up, on the 40 websites of Singapore Airlines. Because most of the GDS product is in big hotels, there is a market gap for e-commerce services sold through the GDS that offer a good choice of small, lower-cost accommodation bookable online in real time.

etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

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Posted in Best practice, Development, Education and qualification, IT, Market knowledge, Performance and management, Sale and marketing, World.

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WEBSITE DESIGN & MANAGEMENT

Website design and managementYour 24/7 window to the World
Designing an effective website for your tourism business requires strategic planning and a decision at a corporate or organizational level to use the internet to achieve specific objectives.
Choose a reputable developer and look at their past portfolio of sites. Discuss what you are looking for in advance. Share ideas and get their professional input. A good designer will translate what you are looking for into appropriate applications and management systems. Emphasize what will the site do for you and which elements of your business will be online. Agree what the site will be able to do and what it will not.

Unless your business is very small or you have little or no interest in online promotion- your site should not be a static off the shelf design that cannot be updated directly by your organization. You will need a Dynamic XML site with self-management capability.

You should aim for a website that is:
• Content Driven
• Right mix of content- Practical and Inspirational
• The Three Easies: Easy to find, Easy to Access, Easy to use
• An Interactive experience
• Has Web 2.0 integration
• Adds value from 3rd party services
• Credible
• Frequently and accurately updated

Map out your site structure and content in advance, and create a site map that charts a users path through the site. Make it as easy as possible to move within the site in a natural and intuitive way.
Your site map will not be linear, but will resemble a flow chart. Always be sure that the user has plenty of easy to understand options and can always access the information they need, and has options to change their mind, go back or use a search tool. The final stage of your customer journey should be a conversion- either to a sale, further enquiry or registration.

Be sure that you agree in advance how the website will be managed and by who. A website should not be managed by an IT department- as the staff do not handle marketing, PR or business functions. Your site is the public face that your company is presenting to the world. Ask yourself- if a potential client visited your offices looking for information, would you refer them to your IT staff to assist them? Your website should be managed by the staff who are directly responsible for the functions and content included in the site.

Dynamic Websites are driven by Content Management Systems (CMS) which run on top of database repositories. They provide easy to use and intuitive tools to help you manage your own website. CMS systems let you update your website reliably and quickly. They provide ‘Room for Growth’ – as your organization grows, your website can be easily expanded to cater to new requirements, services and needs.

Most use a simple WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET (WYSIWYG) editor that provides simple management controls including Word style tool bars for editing page content, and simple folder systems to manage pages and databases of content. For a larger site with large volumes of content or interactive features, a dynamic site that allows multi-user delegation by a central editor is recommended. This means specific people within the organization can be given the responsibility of editing and managing their relevant sections, while the main editor retains overall control.

Use your CMS and database to commoditize your products, and create interactive experiences and if possible, booking functions. Integrate the website into your reservations and accounting systems to streamline your travel distribution. Explore access to the GDS and other distribution channels and allocating rooms or space to online intermediaries.
Once your site is up and running, run regular tests and analyse your user stats and traffic reports.
• Trial your download speeds, search engine ranking, check the links are active
• Get reliable accurate statistics and make informed decisions to change your site
• Are people accessing your site then leaving via their BACK key?
• Learn to read your stats- focus on unique visits and page impressions, rather than ‘hits’.
• Study user behaviour
• Have them subscribe and register where possible
• Monitor your user Feedback and use stats to lobby your management and demonstrate return on Investment
etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

Be Sociable, Share!

Posted in Africa, Americas, Asia, Asia Pacific, Best practice, BRIC, Caribbean, Central America, Customer opinions, Development, East Asia, Education and qualification, Europe, IT, Market knowledge, Middle East, N11, North Africa, North America, Northeast Asia, Oceania, Performance and management, Sale and marketing, South America, South Asia, Sub Saharan, World.

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EMAIL MARKETING

Email marketingMarketing to your Database by Email

E-newsletters have only a limited role in finding new customers, through friend-get-friend and viral techniques. But e-newsletters do have vital uses:
First, they are the most useful tool to move existing customers on from their initial interest through to purchase and repeat purchase. Your CRM capabilities will determine the extent to which you can send accurate, personalised messages that do this
Second, they are invaluable as a way potentially to share with your tourism suppliers the customers you already have. You will probably want to attract revenue from this from paid-for entries by suppliers
Third, emails are the most efficient way to maintain communication after the customer has gone home, in order to:
• Help the customer to re-endorse their choice after the trip, confirm their satisfaction, and relive their holiday
• Help the customer to pass on their good feelings and information to friends and family
• Produce repeat visits, including cross-selling and upselling with new ideas that fit their profile as stored in the CRM database
Finally, any good email campaign management system will provide real-time reporting of results. This will enable to you to fine-tune the selection of customers and content as you go along.

Tips for ongoing email campaigns
• E-mail regularly enough for the recipient to get to know you and your e-mails; once a month is about right. If you have collected their intended travel date, then a series of progressively more frequent emails is desirable. Get the timing right: if the market segment takes last-minute short breaks, 10 days in advance might be right. For a long-haul trip, start a year ahead, and build up the messages. Consider sending your emails at exactly the time of day and on the same day of the week that the recipient originally subscribed: it can produce a 20% increase in click-through rates; 65% increase in conversion rates; and 45% increase in value of order.
• Achieve continuity – of emotive core messages, and of holiday planning information. Try to be sequential with information. Do not change the subject every time. Aim to include a call to action in every email that achieves new data capture and adds to your customer knowledge, progressively enabling you to personalise the relationship.
• Encourage viral effects by including odd, amusing or interesting snippets that recipients will want to share – and include the call to action: ‘Send this to a friend’
• Project your own brand and the Destination’s brand values. For example, some busineses tend to use impersonal terminology, which is not helpful if friendliness is a strong point for you and the Destination.
• Have pictures of real people, and quotes from them – the newsletter editor, a recent visitor, a resident, a local character, a celebrity, or the boss.
• Make it very easy to unsubscribe. If too many recipients add you to their spam blocker, it will trigger blocking by servers of other recipients. If you choose to automate the unsubscribe, and make it a one-click process, it is still worth providing a confirmation message, or users will not entirely believe you have done it. If you really do have good alternative services for the customer, then consider having a two-stage unsubscribe process, to allow the recipient to choose to continue to receive communications on other subjects
• Do not rely on subscribers to keep your database clean: at intervals, ask them to re-validate the enrolment and their data (with a default to ‘Continue’)

etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

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Posted in Africa, Americas, Asia, Asia Pacific, BRIC, Caribbean, Central America, Customer opinions, Development, East Asia, Education and qualification, Europe, IT, Market knowledge, Middle East, N11, North Africa, North America, Northeast Asia, Oceania, Performance and management, Sale and marketing, South America, South Asia, Sub Saharan, World.

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GATHERING CUSTOMER DATA

Gathering customer dataBuilding and managing databases for CRM

To effectively use your gathered data for CRM you will need to be able to:
• Examine the database and make pre-campaign counts of records that fit segments and other criteria
• Specify each segment that is to be mailed, drawing from a selection of database fields. There may be a large number of such segments. There will then be a number of different messages or content versions, one of which will be applicable to each target:
A grid or hierarchy structure will be needed to organise this
It will need to be output in a form that will help sales staff to recruit the newsletter advertisers
• Extract campaign lists, with all the required database fields for each record, and send them to the email and mobile marketing system. Alternatively, the records may be sent to a direct mail house for a postal mailing. The database record should be automatically flagged whenever a record is extracted
• Specify the fulfilment rules – for example, if the recipient clicks on a particular link, they are automatically flagged with a specific interest code, or receive a specified next email
• Add other campaign information, such as costs and a return on investment calculation
• Handle customers who are newly acquired during a campaign, for example, fresh website registrants, or those enrolling for an event
• Feed research survey data (if not anonymous) from online questionnaires into the CRM database

Analysing the data and producing reports to steer strategy

At different times, three types of report will be needed: real-time reporting of campaigns, regular standard reports, and the ability to produce special reports. Standard report formats should be set up in advance by your CRM system supplier. These should enable your marketing users to carry out data analysis using an on-screen query builder that accesses the customer database. The system should allow the marketer to build up a report format from a menu of options. This should include the ability to receive cross-tabulated and matrix reports pulling on fields from the customer database.

You may want reports on:
• Database size, database growth, and proportion of records with key fields completed, shown as totals and by year-to-date, month-on-month, and year-on-year
• Views of the data at global level, by country of residence, region of residence, segment, or by other criteria
• Reports on data completeness – the number of records with valid values in high priority fields against your targets. Examples include enquiry contact method, enquiry campaign code, segment definition fields, interests, planned date of visit, and planned duration of visit
• Cross tabulation of interests versus segments
• Contact methods – the proportion of customer enquiries received via each channel
• Campaign response – the number of customer enquiries received in response to specific campaigns
• Actual bookings – the number and/or percentage of customer enquiries with valid values in key fields such as actual visit duration and actual visit date. This data may be available in your sales system
• Retail data – the volume, cost and types of products sold via your e-commerce system and merchandise shop, and dates
• Data quality:
Quality of address data against official national postal address files
Quality of customer profile data against business rules and/or lookup tables associated with each database field
• Generic requirements for standard reports may include:
• The option to present reports in a graphical or tabular view
• Automatic generation on preset dates or to preset time periods
• Easy viewing by marketing staff and senior management
• Automatic emailing to a defined list of users of links to the reports, at specified intervals

If yours is a large business, you may be asked to pass key data live to the company’s main executive dashboard. A dashboard is a real-time graphic display for managers of performance against main key Performance Indicators (KPIs) drawn from multiple databases across the organisation. The CRM database will be one of the most important contributors to the dashboard
Marketing staff will also need the ability to compile reports on an ad hoc basis to meet specific needs. These would draw on a selection of available key fields in the database, defined in advance with the database supplier.

You should discuss with the supplier the cost advantages of such a facility, and the processing and presentation facilities you might need, compared with paying for such reports as the need arises.

etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

Be Sociable, Share!

Posted in Africa, Americas, Asia, Asia Pacific, BRIC, Caribbean, Central America, Customer opinions, East Asia, Education and qualification, Europe, IT, Market knowledge, Middle East, N11, North Africa, North America, Northeast Asia, Oceania, Performance and management, Sale and marketing, South America, South Asia, Sub Saharan.

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DESTINATION MANAGEMENT

E-tourism_uploadUsing Technology to Manage Resources

The role of the Destination Management Organisation (DMO) is to provide a focal point for all the interdependent players:
• Visitors
• Industry
• Community
• Environment

This tourism ‘community’ includes:
• A number of government departments, including the sponsoring department
• Other official bodies
• Residents, whether they are employed in tourism or not, if they live in an area that is exploited by tourism
• Businesses – from the smallest owner-managed business to the largest corporations, and including the carriers and the intermediaries (such as agents, tour operators, conference organisers); and their trade representative bodies
… and of course, your customers, whether leisure visitors or business tourism clients.

The Destination should thus be seen as a ‘business community’, and to support the creation and operation of the community it is the task of the DMO to provide and operate e-business systems that will be the main media for these players to work together in managing and marketing the Destination. Their e-business systems should:
• Enable the DMO to communicate with all the players
• And enable the players to communicate with each other

The objective for the DMO is to be the facilitator of Destination teamwork, so that the interdependent elements of tourism are drawing up and working to a common agenda, supporting each other, and avoiding duplication. Efficient DMOs, to justify public and private sector investment in their organisations, observe guidelines including:
• Not duplicating what’s already happening and working well
• Aggregating existing product data from the industry, rather than compiling tourist information from scratch
• Not launching its own e-commerce operation if the private sector is, or can be helped, to provide it
• Encouraging and exploiting user-generated content (UGC) which in many areas has rapidly become equally important as information provided by the businesses and the intermediaries
• Taking a lead in co-ordinating new developments such as the use of mobile
• Working with partners, online and offline, to gather and distribute content about the destination through media that achieve greater coverage than can be produced by the DMO’s own activities alone
• Maintaining its core DMO roles: building the brand and promoting new business

E-marketing – summary of benefits and functions for DMOs
• Delivery of massive amounts of information in a user-friendly way: cost-effectiveness in conveying information and products on sale directly, cheaply and at short notice to prime prospects
• Brand-building, now made possible by the rapid spread of broadband connections, allowing users to experience dramatic imagery and animation, as well as enhanced communication and interaction
• Two-way interaction:
Between the DMO and the customer (B2C)
Between customers and other like-minded customers (C2C)
• Joining promotion with sales in a seamless manner, from promotional messages straight through to online purchasing
• Joining offline and online promotion together, to work in harmony so that traffic can be driven in both directions, web to brochures or telephone, telephone to web and so on
• Engaging with customers one-to-one but also using ‘one-to-many’ and ‘one to a selected few’ activities
• The facility to build integrated partnerships with other bodies, official and commercial, throughout the industry and outside it. Partnerships may work at many levels:
• Sharing market intelligence within the industry
• Promoting the DMO’s marketing opportunities and operating co-operative marketing schemes
• Gathering product data, via data feeds, and by hosting product data entry forms that suppliers can use to provide and update their information
• New joint product development
• An integrated and coherent approach to branding of the destination achieved jointly by national, regional, and local tourism organisations and by their public and private stakeholders
• Partnerships may also be interactive partnerships of customers who have shared interests, such as divers or walkers.

Whether the target audiences are end-customers, the media, or tour operators and retail agents in source markets, residents in the home community, or the home industry, DMOs require a wide set of e-marketing tools and techniques:
• Content – collected from partners and by direct DMO work, to form an accurate, timely, and comprehensive resource
• Content distribution – to partners in the destination to enhance their own sales messages, and to third-party media in source markets in order to extend the Destination’s reach
• Websites, including:
• Inspirational branding – dozens of pics, panarounds, lots of video, happy faces, happy tone of voice, consistency
• Information and linking to UGC
• Mapping, diary and itinerary planning tools
• Customer contact methods; at least 3 data capture methods
• Links to e-commerce
• Natural search engine optimisation
• RSS feeds from an to partners and site users
• Onsite research questionnaires, Yes/No polls
• Web analytics, reporting on the traffic to the site and how it is used
• Email marketing
• Online PR
• Online advertising
• Search engine marketing
• Display advertising
• Viral campaigns
• Encouraging UGC through social networking
• On 3rd-party travel sites
• On 3rd-party non-travel sites eg Flickr and YouTube
• On your site
• On blogs
• By promoting tagging
• In Wikis
• Mobile marketing
• Satnav content
• SMS services for travellers on arrival
• Mobile websites for potential visitors and travellers on arrival
• Podcasts
• Interactive digital TV
etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

Be Sociable, Share!

Posted in Best practice, Cooperation and network, Development, Education and qualification, Market knowledge, Performance and management, Policy, Sustainability.

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CUSTOMER RELATIONS MANAGEMENT (CRM)

E-tourism_CRMMaintaining, Strengthening and Building Relationships

CRM is the total of all the continuous business processes that allow us to record, understand and meet the needs of customers. It is about highly defined procedures, not software, although the software is vital in carrying out the procedures. CRM is also a point of view: that the customer comes first in a marketer’s thinking, not the product.

The main CRM objectives of businesses are usually customer retention, customer acquisition, and improving brand awareness. Customers use a variety of offline and online media. They use search engines, check websites, make telephone calls, read brochures, papers and magazines, watch TV, listen to the radio, look at posters, go to exhibitions, open mail shots, and may even walk into your office. Online may be a major part of their lives, or a small part, or no part at all. Cross-media CRM should therefore be a key part of your business processes and the ICT systems that support them.

CRM is:
• Customer data capture (customer acquisition) including details of transactions, if any
• Analysing the customer data so that it can be actioned (customer knowledge)
• Communicating on an ongoing basis with customers to persuade them to travel (‘customer activation’)
• A unified view of each customer, across all the channels used

The operation of the systems that support these business processes, offline and online, usually resides in the e-marketing team. The non-technical challenges for e-marketing CRM staff are:
• To gain acceptance, by online and offline marketers and customer service staff, of the hard and soft procedures and customer service standards that are necessary
• To provide training and support for them to apply the procedures and maintain their motivation
• To ensure adequate monitoring and feedback of performance

The CRM database fields may need to cover:
• Demographics – such as gender, age group, income, education, size of household, location, and occupation
• Psychographics – such as personality and emotional factors connected with buying patterns; is the purchaser likely to be an impulse buyer, for example?
• Lifestyle – the customer’s choice of leisure and entertainment, interests and hobbies, and holidays
• Lifestage – for example, pre-teens, teens, families with young children, and empty nesters
• Values – for example, cultural and national
• Travel intentions – including when, how, and budget
• Travel group – for example, couple, family, extended family, or interest group
• Contact history – including recency, frequency, email open rate, and amount of address data held
• Occasions – for example, wedding, anniversary, or football match

Some of this data will be explicit – given by the customer and used to tailor the content you provide for them on your website or in your newsletter. Some will be implicit – deduced from their actions as a user of your website or e-newsletter. Do not confront your customers with big forms to fill in. Out of perhaps 50 or 100 possible data fields, your business needs to identify a very few as high priority for information capture. All campaign activity should be designed to acquire these. A key tactic is to ask the customer for a little more each time that contact is made.
etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

Be Sociable, Share!

Posted in Best practice, Development, Education and qualification, IT, Market knowledge, Performance and management, Sale and marketing, Sustainability.

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TOURISM EMARKETING

emarketStrategy for Online Marketing

E-marketing is a part of the overall marketing mix, not a separate activity. The key benefits and functions of e-marketing include:

1) Delivery of massive amounts of information in a user-friendly way:cost-effectiveness in conveying information and products on sale directly, cheaply and at short notice to prime prospects
Brand-building, now made possible by the rapid spread of broadband connections, allowing users to experience dramatic imagery and animation, as well as enhanced communication and interaction

2) Two-way interaction:
• Between the supplier and the customer (B2C)
• Between customers and other like-minded customers (C2C)

3) Joining promotional activity seamlessly with online purchasing.

4) Joining offline marketing activities with online so that traffic can be driven in both directions, web to brochures or telephone, telephone to web and so on.

5) The ability to engage with customers on a one-to-one basis, but also to use ‘one-to-many’ and one-to-a-selected-few activities.

6) The facility to build integrated partnerships with other businesses and bodies. Partnerships may work at many levels, as neighbours, or as non-competing sharers of the same kind of visitor. The joint work could be:
• Joint product development
• Sharing market intelligence
• Operating co-operative marketing schemes
• Gathering supportive content via data feeds, for example weather reports, nearby attractions, events

E-marketers need to be clear about the business’s overall marketing objectives. These may be:
• Branding: developing and projecting the brand of your business and your destination.
• Sales: capturing new contacts and converting them into new customers
• I mproving customer retention: a chief aim may be to build more knowledge of existing customers as individuals, and to build stronger relationships with them
• Up-selling or cross-selling to existing customers to gain more value from them

Once the tasks and the priorities are clear, standard marketing disciplines can be applied:
• Target segments: define and understand the target segments. Describe them, their wishes and needs. Use the CRM database, original research.
• Decide the priorities among these segments: for example, are they first-timers or repeaters? If new customers, decide how important recommendations from previous customers are. If recommendations are very important, then recommendation marketing, and especially the encouragement of user-generated content, will be vital – as will the use of targeted email newsletters
• Decide key opportunities within the ‘Customer Journey’

Write a three-year marketing plan with work programmes for each year. Accept that even when you outsource your ICT requirements, the procurement and learning curve for e-marketing makes it difficult to work in one-year cycles. More continuity is needed for e-campaigning than for most offline campaigns. Revise the three-year plan annually. Set targets:

Targets may be very general, such as brand awareness in a key segment in a key market; or very specific, such as number of customers in the CRM database, rate of growth, key fields captured, number of interactions with them, cost per action, cost per acquisition (CPA), value of sale. Targets may focus on one channel you use- for example, number of e-newsletters sent/received/opened/clicked through.

It is usually most effective to operate campaigns jointly with partners- accommodation providers, attractions and event organisers should work together, (and with their tourist board) in commercial groups based on locality, theme and target segment. In any partnership arrangement, be sure to comply with the local data protection laws or codes of conduct in your own country and in the source market.

Whether the target audiences are end-customers, the media, or tour operators and retail agents in source markets, businesses require a wide set of e-marketing tools and techniques:
• Content: accurate, timely, comprehensive content, updated daily, including feeds in from other sites
• Distribution of content, if possible, to other third-party sites that increase reach into key markets
• Websites, including:
Inspirational branding – dozens of pics, panarounds, lots of video, happy faces, happy tone of voice
Information and linking to UGC
• Mapping, diary and itinerary planning tools
• Customer contact methods; at least 3 data capture methods
• Links to e-commerce
• Natural search engine optimisation
• RSS feeds to and from partners and site users
• Onsite research – questionnaires, Yes/No polls
• Web analytics, reporting on the traffic to the site and how it is used
• Email marketing
• Online PR
• Online advertising
• Search engine marketing
• Display advertising
• Viral campaigns
• Encouraging UGC through social networking
On 3rd-party travel sites
On 3rd-party non-travel sites eg Flickr and YouTube
On your site
On blogs
By promoting tagging
In Wikis
• Mobile marketing
• Content given to aggregators of satnav content
• SMS services for travellers on arrival
• Mobile websites for potential visitors and travellers on arrival
• Podcasts
• Interactive digital TV

etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

Be Sociable, Share!

Posted in Best practice, Development, Education and qualification, IT, Market knowledge, Performance and management, Sale and marketing, Sustainability.

Tagged with , , , , , , .


NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR TOURISM

E-tourism_new_technologies_for_tourismDevices and Services for Travel and Content

The huge increase in available bandwidth, particularly wireless broadband (along with parallel enhancements in processing power and memory capacity), is facilitating access to the internet via a variety of media devices. This opens up a ‘new frontier’ for large scale electronic distribution – to visitors travelling to and within Destinations. Driven by the ability to access the internet from multiple ‘media gateways’, the internet is becoming integral to telecommunications, broadcast and publishing media, so that it will become the primary means by which most visitors will:
• Access information
• Access news – such as e-papers and magazines, TV and radio news
• Communicate – including email, phone, video mail, video conferencing, and blogging
From the perspective of visitor information provision, the new media access devices of greatest relevance are:

MP3 technology to allow download of podcasts such as city guides, in audio and/or video form.

Easy to use compact High defintion Digital Video Cameras such as FLIP devices that can directly upload content to the web in the correct format.

Smart web enabled Mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs) for internet access by 3G or by WiFi. WiFi offers ‘hotspots’ that can cover a single room or many square miles overlapping with other hotspots, and allows PCs, phones or PDAs to connect to the internet. WiFi-enabled handheld devices, together with wide area WiFi network provision (including across whole cities) will be of particular interest in enabling low cost access to the internet for information and for voice over internet protocol (VoIP) calls. The convergence with SatNav capability is of great importance (see below) and new services and Apps for Smart phones that allow for “Augmented Reality”- in other words providing real location based services or information links onscreen based on where the device is- or even through recognition of structures or faces through a phone camera.

Hand held and in-car devices that combine internet access and a global positioning system (GPS) that enables satellite navigation (satnav), to provide local route finding and itinerary planning, relating routes of travel to attractions and facilities. The combination of satnav and tourist information on hand-held devices has already begun and will be widely available in the medium term.

An important related development is the advent of ‘location based services’ – to communicate specific information to people, via in-car or handheld devices, when they are in a particular location – for example, for a DMO to provide information about a particular place of interest to people when they are in the vicinity; or to transmit advertising, such as special offers, that are specific to the location.

Fixed internet access points within the Destination, which will become widespread

It is now possible to draw on a wide variety of third-party resources to supply live content for a website. Examples include:
• Online mapping
• Motoring, cycling and walking routes
• Weather forecasts
• News services
• Conditions for special interests, such as safaris, walking, diving and surfing
• Online carbon emissions calculators
• Currency calculator
• Games

etourismfrontiers E-Tourism Frontiers Resources
Staying ahead of the game in the dynamic world of e-tourism can be a real challenge, especially for those of us in emerging markets. E-Tourism Frontiers aims to provide tourism and ICT professionals with the resources and guidance they need to succeed online. The material in this section is a general overview of the topics covered and resources provided in our training courses.

To gain full understanding and make maximum use of these resources, join on of our training seminars, which provide attendees with intensive hands training in online sales, marketing and management skills for both destinations and tourism companies. Our trainers are experienced professionals with extensive experience working in online tourism around the world, including first hand experience of working in emerging markets. We use live demonstrations of working websites and technologies and will give you the skills, resources and support to begin making changes to your business and use the web to improve your organization and business. For full information on our training seminars please see our training section.

The following is a basic overview of the topics that we cover, complete with more information and advice on each area:
What Does Social Media mean for Tourism?.
Online Travel Trends.
Social Networking and Travel.
Travel Social Networks.
New Technologies for Tourism.
Tourism eMarketing.
Destination Management.
Customer Relations Management (CRM).
Gathering Customer Data.
Email Marketing.
Website Design & Management.
E-Commerce.
Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
Web Content.
Content Management Systems.
Online Advertising.

E-TOURISM FRONTIERS Who We Are
E-Tourism Frontiers is a global programme to develop online tourism in emerging markets around the world.
Our aim is to open the developing world’s tourism trade to the world of online travel distribution and marketing- a sector in which the region has been left far behind- with very little inventory available to the online travel shopper. This situation threatens the sustainability and diversity of Tourism and the communities and environment that it supports.
We hold pro-active business driven conference events and training seminars featuring leading online tourism companies, experts and trainers- as well as regional road-shows targeting the travel trade, destination managers and National and regional tourism offices in all emerging markets, including the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia.

The success of our events speaks for itself and is changing the way both the public and private sector do business, manage their resources and market themselves globally, and creating new business relationships with leading international players and technology providers. We work with a range of major international sponsors to be sure that these events are of the highest international standards, as well as accessible and affordable to the complete spectrum of tourism players, including Small to Medium Enterprise (SMEs), Community and Eco-Tourism projects.
Our sponsor partners to date have included major global brands includingMicrosoft, VISA, Safaricom, Vodacom and Coca-Cola and many more together with regional tourism and ICT authorities. Our events have been attended and opened by Ministers and Vice Presidents- and attended by a diverse range of tourism players, from Multinational CEOs to University tourism students.

This article is quoted from E-TOURISM FRONTIERS.

The article is uploaded by Majbritt Magnussen, administrator on ‘Views On Tourism’. Please join the online Views On Tourism network and discussion group in order to achieve personal goals as well as encourage a sustainable tourism development in Bangladesh and South Asia. Read more about this group and how to become a member here.

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